ARTIST

Frank Callozzo

b. 1979

Born in Colorado; lives in San Francisco, California.

I was born in Colorado on January 4, 1979. My father is a Greek Orthodox priest who paints icons. My earliest memories were of these icons and of my father's devotion to the painting and the power of the images. Our family, including my school teacher mother and my two siblings, lived an itinerant lifestyle. Moving from place to place I absorbed rich and diverse cultural influences. By the age of ten we had ended up in Santa Fe where I became interested in folk art traditions and Native American imagery. Likewise, pop culture, and in particular street art, began to play an important role in my development as an artist and I found myself creating graffiti-like images and documenting my thoughts in journals. To harness these skills and artistic impulses I attended Columbia College in Chicago for a more formal study of art history and studio art. Eventually I needed to pursue a more intuitive approach to art and left school to devote myself to creating. I moved back to Santa Fe, have worked with Native American antiques, and actively pursued my art. I maintain a practice of works on paper and paintings on wood and other found materials. My images continue to be drawn from these life influences and take on a deeper meaning gained from my own dream life as well a my spiritual practice, sense of humor, and daily experiences. In the past three years I've self-curated three installations of my work known as the Gypsy Boom-box Series, two in Santa Fe and one in New York City. I've also participated in a group show called Tributaries at Built Gallery in New York.

My time at the Tamarind Institute was energizing and inspiring. The professionalism and skill sets of the print shop as well as the generosity of the administration was encouraging as a young artist. The Tamarind provided the structured environment I needed to find the creative space to take my work to a different level. In exploring a new medium, a new discipline was brought to bear on my methods of expression allowing my work to be both refreshed and expanded.


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